Cam's Blog

November 29, 2010

Julian Assange — A conspiracy as a weighted connected graph

Filed under: Math, Politics — cfranc @ 12:22 pm

This afternoon I found Julian Assange’s old blog via Reddit. It’s a very interesting read; in no time at all I stumbled on this old, unfinished document. In it he describes modeling a conspiracy as a connected graph, where nodes represent individuals in the conspiracy. Edges are weighted according to the value of the information communicated between the two nodes. Assange calls the total weight of the graph the total conspiratorial power of the conspiracy. One can fight a conspiracy by disconnected highly weighted nodes. Traditionally this has been achieved by

killing, kidnapping, blackmailing or otherwise marginalizing or isolating some of the conspirators.

I find this document interesting not because it says anything deep, but because (1) its mathematical bent appeals to me and reveals Assange as an analytical thinker, (2) it was written before Assange began to take on the US political and military conspiracies, and shows that he had been thinking about how one would go about such a fight long before he began Wikileaks, and (3) the fact that it is unfinished leaves one (well, me namely) with the perhaps mythical impression that Assange is too heroically busy to finish setting his thoughts in type. Or, the impression that he is too wise to expose his most closely guarded thoughts to his enemies.

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